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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 32
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
devastation caused by superstorm sandy. >> i think the most likely explanation here is sandy's impact was significant but was so short-lived that it didn't extend to the sample period of the employment report which was the week that covered november 12. >> reporter: hiring was also supposed to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next year, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> repo
barack obama and hurricane sandy. bye-bye mitt. >> anyway, bye-bye mitt happened earlier than that. the 47% tape that was leaked that had him stating that he didn't have to carry about 47% of the public. also the decision to uphold most of obamacare was another defining political moment. >> when i share eleanor's view, i think that video of obama on that 47% of the american public whom he said were happily dependent on the american government -- >> romney. >> who did i say? >> obama. >> obama. definitely not obama. >> go ahead with it. >> but that -- i don't think romney did this with anticipation that it might suddenly come out. but when it came out, it was the worst political moment of his career. >> you think so. >> you can tell this is not rehearsed because i picked the 47% moment, too. it said so much about where the debate has gone. i think it's a turning point now. >> i will give you the true turning point. take this down. clarence, use it in your column. the most defining moment mitt romney's no show after the shore after it was hit hard by hurricane sandy. romney left the
: still ahead, the hurricane sandy relief concert tonight that's expected to raise tens of millions of dollars. how safe is your money when you give it away to a charity? >> tom: the federal reserve continuing to pump money in the economy, always brings up concerns about inflation, but many commodity prices remain below the current prices. lincoln is with us from the c.m.e. group in chicago. what do you think the federal reserve's actions today and the worries about the economy, say about commodity demand in the next year? >> it looks as though the federal reserve thinks the commodity demand will continue to be weak. in fact, as you rightly point out, many commodities off their recent highs made in late august, early september, continue to suggest that the demand picture, the actual structural issues that ben bernanke and the team are worried about are still very much in play. a very weak economy means weak demand in the commodity complex. >> tom: it sounds like the commodities are responding to the economics, as opposed to all of the money the federal reserve is flooding into the m
close to $5 a gallon for gasoline, of course it was because of hurricane sandy and standing in line, gas lines, and now this. i know it is a special situation, but what is going on here? >> well, that was a special situation, it was incredible disruption of the supply chain to the northeast, if you recall, only northern new jersey had to endure the odd, even rationing it shows you how isolated that was, but what is going on here, suze is that the united states is in the process of becoming energy independent, it is in the process of surpassing saudi arabia as the world's number one producer of oil. because of the shale drilling that going on, mostly in the middle of the country. there is also a massive expansion of a big refinery down in texas, that the saudis are working on with royal dutch shell and the industry is refiguring the infrastructure zero to get more of that mid continent middle of the country oil down to the gulf coast where we could see a tremendous price break next year. >> that is really amazing stuff, let's look at some of the numbers on gas and oil and your outlook, i
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the c
sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking wit
first graders killed at sandy hook elementary. townspeople are still reeling. >> really sad. i didn't want to go back to work today. it hit me hard because i got two kids too. the same age that happened to these kids. it really hit hard, like a parent, like a dad. >> suarez: a somber weekend had concluded with last night's vigil at newtown high school about a mile away from the scene of the killings. ( applause ) police and emergency personnel got a standing ovation as they entered the auditorium. president obama met privately with the victims' families before addressing the shaken crowd. >> i can only hope it helps for you to know that you're not alone in your grief. that our world too has been torn apart, that all across this land of ours we have went with you. we pulled our children tight. and you must know that whatever measure of comfort we can provide, we will provide. whatever portion of sadness that we can share with you to ease this heavy load, we will gladly bear. newtown, you are not alone. >> suarez: the weekend also brought new details in the the investigation. police c
automakers got a bump up in sales in november, thanks to super storm sandy. consumers postponed purchases when the hurricane hit in october, and resumed buying last month. but as diane eastabrook reports, the looming fiscal cliff could cause that sales momentum to lose traction. >> reporter: november turned out to be a good month for the big three and a great month for their foreign competitors. g.m. and ford both saw a modest uptick in vehicle sales last month-- while chrysler got a double digit boost. but competitors from europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent up demand coming from, especially from the average age of the vehicles being over eleven years at this point in the
of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors, police were on hand as were counselors. >> making the kids safe and happy. that's all we're here for. is to make sure that they are safe and happy. >> suarez: sandy hook itself remains closed. plans call for its students to be sent to a now vacant school in nearby monroe, but it was unclear when. back in washington, a string of democratic members of congress took to the house floor calling for new gun legislation. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we need to pass bold, necessary, overdue gun control legislation. if we do not, this will happen again. >> 20 innocents and their six teachers. more tears. more burials. but will we heed its meaning? will we break the gun lobby's spell? >> suarez: outside the capital, the head of the brady campa
than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped loo
be exacerbated by global warming, any time? >> you know, it's interesting, because i think hurricane sandy really woke a lot of people up about the risk of rising sea level in the future for coastal communities. 75% of california residents live within an hour of the coast. and, you know, basically the ocean has already risen eight inches in the last 100 years. we can measure that by the tidal gauge at ft. point in san francisco which has sat there more than 100 years. the same gauge, the same water. these are not al gore's theories. these are measurable phenomenon, empirical data. as the ocean continues to rise, we're going to see more days like these high water events. so there's a non-profit group called the california king tides initiative. and there are similar ones in oregon, washington, british columbia, that asks people to go out and photograph this phenomena before and after and post it on websites so you can see what the future is going to be like. >> david, you had a question? >> yeah, we also had some flooding down here because of the king tides. paul, i'm wondering about how do you st
at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: joining me now is michael bloomberg. he's the mayor of new york city and he's also the co-chair of mayors a
-covered memorial to those lost at sandy hook. >> as a parent, i just wanted o come to respect the kids and the adulls. it touched everybody's heart. i just couldn't move forward without coming this morning early, you know, and just saying a prayer. >> we just wanted to come down and show support for the families obviously they will never be the same again. whose holidays will never be. >> ifill: in parts of the country's mid section, the holiday was marked by bad weather. snow was moving from the ozarks through the ohio valley, causing blizzard warnings in indiana and kentucky. sleet, freezing rain caused a 21-car pile-up in oklahoma. and left cars spinning on icy roads all the way into western maryland. >> i tried to back up. i couldn't see. i backed into this little wooden whatever the heck that is, busted out my side of my back light there. now i'm stuck here. >> ifill: farther south parts of the gulf coast were on alert for tornadoes and powerful thunderstorms. but the weather wasn't a problem everywhere. downunderwhere it's summer, christmas meant a trip to the beach in sydney, au
. >> rose: damage from sandy is staggering. millions in the northeast struggle in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> the ravages of hurricane sandy remain a real and immediate problem in brooklyn. >> we support each other. we do what we can financially for each other but right now being scattered, it's hard. >> but on the whole, residents have risen to the challenge and restaurants have played an important role. >> we started cooking chicken for the people in the projects that were still home bound. >> almost -- someone just almost got run over. >> oh, here you, go perfect. hipsters and their hipster baby. >> he's a licensed new york city taxi driver. he gives food tours and he was our guide for the day. >> let's go. so our first stop is a little lunch counter. we're going to go -- it's certainly only jewish deli in the whole city that's closed for ramadan. so here we have to get brisket. so we get brisket on rye with gravy and a pastrami sandwich on rye with mustard. hey, how's it going? can we get a pastrami on rye with mustard, medium, please. >> wow, look at this. thank you. you can se
sandy which obviously affected millions of people and really caught the public's imaginationment but it didn't end. coverage of other hurricanes h there is a beginning, a middle and an end. the fact is what sandy did or seems to have done is to take the idea of climate change from an abstraction, something that scientists and experts debated, to something that millions of people along the east coast and in manhattan and staten island and the other boroughs in new york city experienced for themselves and it started a debate. we don't know obviously what the long-term consequences are, but it does suggest there is something different about this story and its long-term implications. >> woodruff: and it's interesting, michael, because we've had big storms in this country before. >> sure. >> woodruff: but there was something different about this one? >> i think people are getting a little more alert to it politically. and one thing that historians of the future do is if something terrible happens, if climate change over the next 50 years or so achieve great injury to this earth, histo
year, isaac in august and recently sandy. each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started ten months after the quake. at the cholera ward of saint luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prince, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have drop
watching chris christie a lot whether it was to do super storm sandy or whether to campaign for mitt romney. there's a lot of question about whether he would get the challenge from the very popular mayor of newark, at least popular in some circles cory booker. >> what's interesting about this is that cory booker put out a web video which is how all the politicians announce these days. he said i'm interested in running for senate. that job isn't actually open at this point. senator frank lautenberg holds that seat, a long-time democrat. he has not telegraphed what he's going to do. when cory booker put out this statement that he was going to run lautenberg said there's a time for politics. it's next year. that's when i'll address it. >> lautenberg is 8 years old. he's in his 80s. he might decide to run. he could be... decide to keep that challenge afloat there. we could either be talking about a democratic primary or booker is very well known. he's got a strong national presence. so this is somebody who could clear the field for the democrats but either way it will be competitive. republican
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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